Virtual Fitness: How To Do Standing Dumbbell Lateral Raise

Standing Dumbbell Lateral Raise

The Dumbbell Lateral Raise strengthens the muscles of the mid shoulder (mid-deltoid).

Instructions: Slowly lift arms until dumbbells are shoulder height. Slowly release down to your sides. Keep your feet about hip width for stability. Avoid lifting your shoulders. Perform 3 sets of 8-10 repetitions. Do fewer sets and reps if you’re unable to do 3 of 8-10.
Modifications: 1) Use lighter weights. 2) Use wrist weights instead of dumbbells.
Caution: If you experience discomfort during the exercise, you may be using too much weight, or the position of this exercise may not be suitable for you. Reduce the weight if you notice your shoulders lifting, your head poking forward, or you’re experiencing body swing.
EXERCISE DOs and DONTs – As with all exercise programs, when using exercise videos that appear on this site, you need to use common sense. If your muscles are weak, either do the modifications, or don’t attempt this exercise if it’s too difficult for you. When starting an exercise program, be sure to discuss your plans with your healthcare provider

Virtual Fitness: How To Do Medicine Ball Obliques

Medicine Ball Obliques

Strengthens oblique abdominal muscles. Improves core stabilization.
Instructions: Move side-to-side while holding the medicine ball. If the medicine ball is too heavy you won’t be able to do this exercise properly without lifting your shoulders, creating excess tension in that area.
Modifications: Perform the exercise without the medicine ball. Cross your arms on your chest and practise moving side-to-side. As you gain strength, add a light weight medicine ball.

EXERCISE DOs and DONTs – As with all exercise programs, when using exercise videos that appear on this site, you need to use common sense. If your muscles are weak, either do the modifications, or don’t attempt this exercise if it’s too difficult for you. When starting an exercise program, be sure to discuss your plans with your healthcare provider

Virtual Fitness: How To Do Walking Dumbbell Lunge

Walking Dumbbell Lunge


Instructions: Alternate stepping forward with right and then left foot. Hold and stabilize between steps. As strength increases, add more weight to increase challenge.
Modifications: 1) Take smaller steps forward and bring both feet together after each step. 2) Place hands on hips instead of holding weights. 3) Hold onto a wall with one hand, with opposite hand on your hip or at your side.
Moving Lunge Benefits: Strengthens thighs, legs and core. Improves balance.
Cautions: Slow your tempo to suit your ability. The goal is to maintain a steady pace without losing balance.
EXERCISE DOs and DONTs – As with all exercise programs, when using exercise videos that appear on this site, you need to use common sense. If your muscles are weak, either do the modifications, or don’t attempt this exercise if it’s too difficult for you. When starting an exercise program, be sure to discuss your plans with your healthcare provider

Super Fit When You’re Super-Old

Johanna Quaas, 86 Year-Old Gymnast competes at Cottbus World Cup in Germany.

Gymnast Johanna Quaas has been active her entire life. She started competing at the age of 57, and has won 11 medals in senior gymnastics competitions.  There’s no secret here.  It’s just committment, dedication, and hard work.

Thankfully, Johanna Quaas defies the stereotype of what it’s like to be an 80 year-old woman.  She’s what’s possible if we stay active.

It’s safe to say that when asked, most people would like to  be in good shape as they age.  In June 2012, the Centers for Disease Control reported that more Americans are exercising, while obesity is rising.

Obesity interferes with normal range of motion, making exercise difficult. It also places more strain on the heart and lungs, causing them to work harder, than someone of normal weight.

Everyone should be concerned about aging.  Getting old doesn’t mean you’ll be on automatic deterioration mode. On the other hand, if you want to be dependent, frail, chronically ill, and medicated, when you get old, all you have to do is neglect your health.

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Copyright 2012 Irene Pastore and Blue Moon Personal Training