How To Avoid Shin Splints

WHAT IS A SHIN SPLINT
Tibial Stress Syndrome is the medical name for shin splints, an injury that causes pain, tenderness, and swelling in the leg, along the tibia (shin bone).  The leg is the area between the knee and ankle.

SHIN STRETCH

WHO GETS SHIN SPLINTS
Shin splits are common among runners, and other athletes.

WHAT CAUSES SHIN SPLINTS

  • Repetitive use of the same muscle(s) in sports such as tennis, soccer, and running.  Risk is higher if the activity is vigorous.
  • Pes planus (flat feet).
  • Muscle imbalance.
  • Returning to exercise before an injury has healed. 
  • Neglecting to build a foundation in your sport, and taking on too much too soon.
  • Not enough variety in your exercise routine.

HOW TO PREVENT SHIN SPLINTS

  • Wear proper footwear, and orthotics if needed.
  • Replace worn out shoes.  
  • Avoid rough, or hard terrain by running on track, rather than pavement for more shock absorption.

CALF STRETCH

WHAT MUSCLES ARE AFFECTED
Shin splints affect the muscles of the leg.  That’s the area between your knee and ankle: Gastrocnemius, Soleus, Tibialis Anterior.

WHERE TO FIND TREATMENT
Seek help from a sports medicine physician, if you think you have a shin splint injury.

HOW ARE SHIN SPLINTS TREATED
Shin splints are treated with ice packs, anti-inflammatory medication, rest, and shin splint stretching.

WHAT ARE SHIN SPLINT STRETCHES
Stretching the muscles of your leg helps to prevent, and heal shin splints.  The leg muscles are the Gastrocnemius (Calf), Soleus (Calf), and Tibialis Anterior (Shin).

For more information about Tibial Stress Syndrome, click on the link to WebMD, and MedLine Plus.

Information in this post is educational.  It should not be used to replace medical advice from your physician, or other healthcare provider.

The exercises described in this post are informational, and not meant to replace the guidance of a personal trainer, in a live setting.  Exercises performed incorrectly may result in injury.

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Copyright 2012 Irene Pastore, and Blue Moon Personal Training

Posted on July 27, 2012, in Exercise, Injury Prevention and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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